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Darunavir 25 mg

£97.00

HIV protease inhibitor

SKU: BSV-S5250

Darunavir is a nonpeptidic HIV protease inhibitor, used to treat HIV infection.

Target: HIV protease

Chemical name: Carbamic acid, N-[(1S,2R)-3-[[(4-aminophenyl)sulfonyl](2-methylpropyl)amino]-2-hydroxy-1-(phenylmethyl)propyl]-, (3R,3aS,6aR)-hexahydrofuro[2,3-b]furan-3-yl ester

Formula: C27H37N3O7S

Molecular weight: 547.66

Purity: 99.04 %

Solubility: 100 mg/mL (DMSO), 11 mg/mL (ethanol)

Size: 25 mg

Storage: 3 years -20°C powder, 2 years -80°C in solvent

Darunavir is an antiretroviral protease inhibitor that is used in the therapy and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Darunavir can cause transient and usually asymptomatic elevations in serum aminotransferase levels and has been linked to rare instances of clinically apparent, acute liver injury. In HBV or HCV coinfected patients, highly active antiretroviral therapy with darunavir may result of an exacerbation of the underlying chronic hepatitis B or C.

Darunavir is only found in individuals that have used or taken this drug. It is a protease inhibitor used to treat HIV. It acts on the HIV aspartyl protease which the virus needs to cleave the HIV polyprotein into its functional fragments. Darunavir is a HIV protease inhibitor which prevents HIV replication by binding to the enzyme’s active site, thereby preventing the dimerization and the catalytic activity of the HIV-1 protease. Darunavir selectively inhibits the cleavage of HIV encoded Gag-Pol polyproteins in virus-infected cells, which prevents the formation of mature infectious virus particles. Structual analyses suggests that the close contact that darunavir has with the main chains of the protease active site amino acids (Asp-29 and Asp-30) is an important contributing factor to its potency and wide spectrum of activity against multi-protease inhibitor resistant HIV-1 variants. Darunavir can also adapt to the changing shape of a protease enzyme because of its molecular flexibility. Darunavir is known to bind to two distinct sites on the enzyme: the active site cavity and the surface of one of the flexible flaps in the protease dimer.